The Future Of The Flying Car

5 Cars With The Most Potential

[Infographic Included: The History Of The Flying Car]

by Bill Flitter

A flying car is a thing of science fiction, right? Cars that travel on air instead of roads appear in the movies, cartoons, and books about the future. Are we finally getting to the point of maybe, possibly, having a ‘real’ flying car?

We’re barely getting over electric-car range anxiety! And now this?

There are some actual cars that do fly, as shown in this video (just fast-forward to the 40-second mark if you want to skip the history of flying cars and a segment on how George Jetson was just a big tease with his flying-saucer car).

Did you know...

The first flying car patent was issued in 1917 to Glenn Curtiss of Paris.

A Flying Car? A Look At The Cars We’ll Be Driving Flying In The Future

Kitty Hawk

Google finally did it: they made a flying car; but, not really. Google made a splash recently by announcing the Kitty Hawk, which sports four drones with large propellers on each corner, there are two sporty looking pontoons underneath the propellers, and there’s a web netting that should protect the driver from being sliced to shreds if they fall off the seat-like thing. And, of course, there’s a joystick type of device for steering. The video suggests that the Kitty Hawk is for the elite who already own large homes on a lake with a dock and a boat and who want even more fun out of life. But after the initial thrill, how fun and practical is the Kitty Hawk? It only operates over water, does not move very fast, and does not appear safe with those exposed propellers.

Henry Ford, 1940

Mark my words: A combination airplane and motorcar is coming. You may smile. But it will come…

Pal V

The Pal V One is a “car and gyro-plane hybrid.” You can drive it down the road with three wheels or fly it through the air with helicopter propellers. Made by Dutch company, Pal V, the Pal V One is a two-person vehicle that can go from car to helicopter in just a few steps.

Terrafugia Transition

The Terrafugia Transition is a plane that wants to be a car. A small difference for sure, but this vehicle has pilots in mind instead of drivers. The Transition will fit two people and is a state-of-the-art marvel. The wings fold up to become street legal and it does fit in a standard garage or parking spot. Best of all, the Transition runs on standard gasoline, no expensive jet fuel necessary.

Did you know...

47% of people would be interested in owning a flying car at some point in the future.

Maverick LSA

The Maverick LSA flying car is built rugged for off-road adventures. Based out of Florida, iTech is hoping this vehicle will catch on so they can drop the $90,000 price tag. While the Maverick LSA isn’t quite as advanced as the Transition, it does appear to be a ton of fun to fly, or more like hang glide. The video doesn’t show how it transitions from a sport buggy to hang glider, but I’m sure that won’t stop you from wanting to figure it out.

Did you know...

77% of consumers said they would have safety concerns about traveling in flying cars.

Aeromobile SRO

Manufactured by Aeromobile SRO, a Slovakian company, the Aeromobile 3.0 is something straight out of the future. It looks and behaves like a spaceship from 2050 and they’ve already been testing it for three years now. You can land the plane on any runway, flat surface, or even grassy field and it is completely street legal. Like the Transition, it also runs on standard gasoline and can surpass speeds of 100 mph. Don’t expect to see these in mass quantities anytime soon though. Productions models will cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Maybe this is something your kids, or grandkids, will drive and fly!

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Flying Car History - Infographic

Flying Car History Infographic

Over To You

These are just a few of the flying cars currently in the works. Would you buy a flying car anytime soon? How much would you be willing to spend to have your own personal air vehicle?